At STRŌMA®, we are grounded in science to empower you to change the way the world sees you.

Below are some of the more common questions we receive about our technology. If you don’t find what you are looking for, visit our forum on Facebook.

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MOST COMMON QUESTIONS

1. What is the STRŌMA® Laser System procedure?

The STRŌMA® Laser System is a patented technology for changing eye color from brown to blue, green, or lighter brown.

2. How does the STRŌMA® Laser System work?

Under every brown eye is a blue or green eye. A thin layer of brown pigment coats the front surface of the iris of the eye. The STRŌMA® technology uses a low-energy laser to raise and lower the temperature of this layer of dark pigment several times. This action signals the body to digest the pigment as debris. Scavenger cells called “macrophages” digest the pigment into the iris and eliminate it through the bloodstream. This process takes up to four weeks, and the result is a natural blue or green eye. The technology can also reduce the density of the pigment, resulting in a lighter brown eye.

3. When will the STRŌMA® procedure be commercially available?

The STRŌMA® technology is not yet commercially available, and we do not provide anticipated release dates or time periods because there are too many factors beyond our control. STRŌMA® plans to announce initial commercial availability on our website, via email updates to those who have signed up for them, and on social media six months prior to availability in each country. To sign up for updates, click HERE.

4. Where can I have the STRŌMA® procedure performed?

The STRŌMA® technology is not yet commercially available, and we do not provide anticipated release dates or time periods because there are too many factors beyond our control. We plan to announce initial commercial availability on our website, via email updates to those who have signed up for them, and on social media six months prior to availability in each country. To sign up for updates, click HERE.
The procedure should eventually be available in all major cities worldwide. Although we expect to release initially in Europe, we have no way of knowing the order of releases until announcements are made. We also plan to provide a physician database with a search function, so that interested patients can easily locate Certified STRŌMA® Physicians closest to them and confirm whether a physician is a genuine Certified STRŌMA® Physician.

5. When will the STRŌMA® procedure be commercially available in the United States?

We do not expect to obtain FDA approval in the United States until at least a few years after we release the STRŌMA Laser System in other key markets, like the European Union.

6. Can I choose my eye color with STRŌMA® procedure?

A color consists of three components: hue, saturation, and value. Eye color hues may be black, brown, hazel, green, or blue. Saturation is the amount of white in a color. In the case of eye color, grey-blue or grey-green eye is less saturated than a deep blue or green. Value is the light reflected by a color. In the case of eye color, the higher the saturation, the lower the value. Most people like high value, low saturation colors like grey-blue or grey-green.
The STRŌMA® technology is designed to remove the pigment that makes your eye black, brown, or hazel and reveal your natural underlying hue—blue or green. The STRŌMA® technology cannot change your natural underlying hue. In most cases, however, it can modify your saturation and value post-operatively. The result of the basic procedure could be a grey-blue or grey-green iris. If after the pigment is eliminated by the basic procedure, you decide that you want a deeper eye-color saturation, our laser can be tuned for a second treatment designed to accomplish saturation enhancement. If you want a still deeper saturation, this saturation treatment can be repeated. The saturation procedure can be performed 30 days or longer after the preceding treatment, even after several years.

7. Can my STRŌMA® physician predict my underlying eye color hue?

STRŌMA® will provide its physicians with a technology designed to predict your underlying eye color hue. The technology is still undergoing clinical testing, but thus far, its predictions have been accurate. The technology will generate an image of your face with your predicted eye color hue or range of eye color hues. Our plan is to release this technology alongside the STRŌMA Laser System.

8. Can I see before-and-after photos of STRŌMA® patients?

Until recently, we have treated only partial irises because we can learn almost as much from partial iris treatments as we can from full iris treatments with less risk to trial participants. We have not released these images because they do not represent our full iris results. We are currently treating full irises, however, and we plan to release before-and-after images once the study is complete. We plan to release these images on our website, via email updates to those who have signed up for them, and on social media. To sign up for updates, click HERE.

9. Is the STRŌMA® procedure safe?

STRŌMA® is obsessed with the safety of its technology. We believe that it would be inexcusable to release a cosmetic procedure that poses a significant risk of harm to patients.
The STRŌMA® procedure has undergone several clinical studies in humans, and no adverse events have been reported to date. Before the procedure can be declared safe, however, it will have to undergo additional testing and satisfy the requirements of multiple regulatory bodies. In our next and final study phases, we plan to treat about 200 patients and follow them for about one year. When the results of our clinical studies confirm that our procedure is safe and effective, we will apply for approval on a country-by-country basis and release the technology in a controlled manner to assure positive patient outcomes.

10. How long does the STRŌMA® procedure take?

The total treatment time is less than one minute per eye. You will be given a few medications beginning about 20 minutes prior to the procedure and immediately after the procedure.

11. Is the STRŌMA® procedure painful?

None of our trial patients has reported feeling anything at all during or after the procedure. In fact, in many cases, participants do not realize that they have already been treated.

12. What is the recovery time after the STRŌMA® procedure?

Recovery should be minimal. The STRŌMA® physician will inform the patient when it is safe to drive and return to work. In most cases, the patient should be able to function immediately after the procedure, although night driving should be avoided for the first few hours because the pupils will be constricted due to one of the eye drop medications.

13. Does the STRŌMA® procedure work on all dark eyes, regardless of how dark and regardless of race or ethnicity?

Our studies so far indicate that the STRŌMA® procedure works on all dark eye-color variations and on all races and ethnicities.

14. Can I have this procedure if I’ve had previous eye surgeries, such as LASIK, SMILE, PRK, IOL implantation, or retinal surgery?

The STRŌMA® physician will determine whether or not you are a candidate for the procedure. Clouding or scarring of the cornea, or previous surgery that altered your iris, could exclude a patient from treatment. In general, however, previous ophthalmic procedures, properly performed, should not preclude a patient from having the STRŌMA® procedure, provided that your eyes are otherwise healthy.

15. How much will the procedure cost?

STRŌMA® will not be performing the procedure or setting the price. Instead, STRŌMA® will license and certify leading ophthalmologists in each country, and these ophthalmologists will perform the procedure and set the price for doing so. The price will likely vary from territory-to-territory and from ophthalmologist-to-ophthalmologist, but we expect the price to be in line with other cosmetic and ophthalmic procedures in the same territory.

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DESCRIPTION OF THE STRŌMA® PROCEDURE

1. What is the STRŌMA® procedure?

The STRŌMA® Laser System is a patented technology for changing eye color from brown to blue, green, or lighter brown.

2. How does the STRŌMA® procedure work?

Under every brown eye is a blue or green eye. A thin layer of brown pigment coats the front surface of the iris of the eye. The STRŌMA® technology uses a low-energy laser to raise and lower the temperature of this layer of dark pigment several times. This action signals the body to digest the pigment as debris. Scavenger cells called “macrophages” digest the pigment into the iris and eliminate it through the bloodstream. This process takes up to four weeks, and the result is a natural blue or green eye. The technology can also reduce the density of the pigment, resulting in a lighter brown eye.

3. Can I choose my eye color with STRŌMA® procedure?

A color consists of three components: hue, saturation, and value. Eye color hues may be black, brown, hazel, green, or blue. Saturation is the amount of white in a color. In the case of eye color, grey-blue or grey-green eye is less saturated than a deep blue or green. Value is the light reflected by a color. In the case of eye color, the higher the saturation, the lower the value. Most people like high value, low saturation colors like grey-blue or grey-green.
The STRŌMA® technology is designed to remove the pigment that makes your eye black, brown, or hazel and reveal your natural underlying hue—blue or green. The STRŌMA® technology cannot change your natural underlying hue. In most cases, however, it can modify your saturation and value post-operatively. The result of the basic procedure could typically a grey-blue or grey-green iris. If after the pigment is eliminated by the basic procedure, you decide that you want a deeper eye-color saturation, our laser can be tuned for a second treatment designed to accomplish saturation enhancement. If you want a still deeper saturation, this saturation treatment can be repeated. The saturation procedure can be performed 30 days or longer after the preceding treatment, even after several years.

4. Can my STRŌMA® physician predict my underlying eye color hue?

STRŌMA® will provide its physicians with a technology designed to predict your underlying eye color hue. The technology is still undergoing clinical testing, but thus far, its predictions have been accurate. The technology will generate an image of your face with your predicted eye color hue or range of eye color hues. Our plan is to release this technology alongside the STRŌMA® Laser System.

5. How long is the STRŌMA® procedure?

The total treatment time is less than one minute per eye. You will be given a few medications beginning about 20 minutes prior to the procedure and immediately after the procedure.

6. Is the STRŌMA® procedure painful?

None of our trial patients has reported feeling anything at all during or after the procedure. In fact, in many cases, participants do not realize that they have already been treated.

7. What is the recovery time after the STRŌMA® procedure?

Recovery should be minimal. The STRŌMA® physician will inform the patient when it is safe to drive and return to work. In most cases, the patient should be able to function immediately after the procedure, although night driving should be avoided for the first few hours because the pupils will be constricted due to one of the eye drop medications.

8. Are the images posted on your Facebook, Instagram, and other social media sites actual STRŌMA® patients?

Until recently, we have treated only partial irises because we can learn almost as much from partial iris treatments as we can from full iris treatments with less risk to trial participants. We have not released these images because they do not represent our full iris results. We are currently treating full irises, however, and we plan to release before-and-after images once the study is complete. We plan to release these images on our website, via email updates to those who have signed up for them, and on social media. To sign up for updates, click HERE.

9. When may I see before-and-after photos of STRŌMA® patients?

Until recently, we have treated only partial irises because we can learn almost as much from partial iris treatments as we can from full iris treatments with less risk to trial participants. We have not released these images because they do not represent our full iris results. We are currently treating full irises, however, and we plan to release before-and-after images once the study is complete. We plan to release these images on our website, via email updates to those who have signed up for them, and on social media. To sign up for updates, click HERE.

10. Are the effects of the STRŌMA® procedure permanent?

Pigment cells (“melanocytes”) do not typically regenerate, so we expect the results of the STRŌMA® procedure to be permanent.

11. Will people be able to tell that I’ve had the STRŌMA® procedure?

Your eyes will be dark before the procedure and are likely to remain dark for several days after the procedure. For up to the next four weeks, your eyes will gradually get lighter. The change will not be sudden. Your eyes should look completely natural, and not even an ophthalmologist should be able to tell that you’ve had the procedure. Once your eyes have lightened completely, you will look different. Most people will probably realize that you look different, without realizing that your eye color has changed.

12. How long does it take for is the STRŌMA® procedure to take effect?

Under every brown eye is a blue or green eye. A thin layer of brown pigment coats the front surface of the iris of the eye. The STRŌMA® technology uses a low-energy laser to raise and lower the temperature of this layer of dark pigment several times. This action signals the body to digest the pigment as debris. Scavenger cells called “macrophages” digest the pigment into the iris and eliminate it through the bloodstream. This process takes up to four weeks, and the result is a natural blue or green eye. The technology can also reduce the density of the pigment, resulting in a lighter brown eye.

13. Will any dark pigment remain in my eye after the STRŌMA® procedure?

The STRŌMA® procedure is capable of removing all pigment from your irises. The laser system is able to leave pigment in specific areas, such as around the pupil, and to feather out the pigment at the edges so it looks natural. If enough patients express an interest in leaving some pigment in the iris, we would consider making it available.

14. Can the STRŌMA® procedure change the color of just one of my eyes or create text, images, or patterns in my eyes?

The STRŌMA® laser is capable of removing pigment in any pattern, but we limit the use of our procedure to create natural looking outcomes. As a result, Certified STRŌMA® Physicians are generally not permitted to treat only one eye or to use the STRŌMA® laser to create text, images, or unnatural patterns in the iris.

15. If my eyes are different colors, can the STRŌMA® laser system make them the same color?

Some eyes are different colors. One iris may contain sections of different colors. The condition is called “sectoral heterochromia.” If the right and left eyes are different colors, the condition is called “bilateral heterochromia.” If both eyes are treated with the STRŌMA® laser, they should become a single, contiguous color. In each case, our ability to use the STRŌMA® laser to treat heterochromia will depend upon the reason the eyes are different colors in the first place. If the color disparity exists as the result of an injury or disease, that injury or disease might exclude the patient from treatment. We will explore this further in our clinical studies.

16. Can the STRŌMA® procedure remove iris freckles?

Yes.

17. Will I have a dark ring around the outer boundary of my iris after the STRŌMA® procedure?

You might have noticed that some people with light eyes have a dark ring around the outer boundary of the iris. This ring is called a “limbal ring.” One of the most famous limbal rings was featured on the cover of the June 1985 issue of National Geographic Magazine. The model was Sharbat Gula, an Afghani woman with beautiful green eyes outlined by a black limbal ring.
The iris tissue becomes extremely thin as it approaches the outer boundary. The back of the iris is covered in a very thick, dark layer of pigment called the “iris pigment epithelium” or “IPE.” The limbal ring is actually the IPE showing through the thin boundary of the iris. Most dark eyes have a dark IPE, and most irises are thin at the outer boundary, so most patients will have a limbal ring after the STRŌMA® procedure. Our laser is capable of leaving a ring of pigment along the outer boundary of the iris to create the appearance of a limbal ring, but we do not believe it will look natural. We will explore this further in our clinical trails.

18. Can some pigment remain around the boundary of my pupil after the STRŌMA® procedure?

Although the STRŌMA® procedure is designed to remove all pigment from the iris, it is able to leave some pigment around the pupil boundary and to feather out the pigment at the edges so it looks natural. If enough patients express an interest in leaving some pigment in the iris, we would consider making it available.

19. Will my STRŌMA® physician be able to tell before my STRŌMA® procedure whether I will have a limbal ring after my STRŌMA® procedure?

Yes.

20. How is the STRŌMA® procedure performed?

Under every brown eye is a blue or green eye. A thin layer of brown pigment coats the front surface of the iris of the eye. The STRŌMA® technology uses a low-energy laser to raise and lower the temperature of this layer of dark pigment several times. This action signals the body to digest the pigment as debris. Scavenger cells called “macrophages” digest the pigment into the iris and eliminate it through the bloodstream. This process takes up to four weeks, and the result is a natural blue or green eye. The technology can also reduce the density of the pigment, resulting in a lighter brown eye.

21. Can the STRŌMA® procedure increase the color saturation of a gray-blue or gray-green eye?

A color consists of three components: hue, saturation, and value. Eye color hues may be black, brown, hazel, green, or blue. Saturation is the amount of white in a color. In the case of eye color, grey-blue or grey-green eye is less saturated than a deep blue or green. Value is the light reflected by a color. In the case of eye color, the higher the saturation, the lower the value. Most people like high value, low saturation colors like grey-blue or grey-green.
The STRŌMA® technology is designed to remove the pigment that makes your eye black, brown, or hazel and reveal your natural underlying hue—blue or green. The STRŌMA® technology cannot change your natural underlying hue. In most cases, however, it can modify your saturation and value post-operatively. The result of the basic procedure could typically be a grey-blue or grey-green iris. If after the pigment is eliminated by the basic procedure, you decide that you want a deeper eye-color saturation, our laser can be tuned for a second treatment designed to accomplish saturation enhancement. If you want a still deeper saturation, this saturation treatment can be repeated. The saturation procedure can be performed 30 days or longer after the preceding treatment, even after several years.

22. Does the STRŌMA® procedure change the patient’s DNA?

The STRŌMA® procedure does not change your DNA. As a result, your children will have the same eye color whether or not you have the STRŌMA® procedure.

23. Does a patient’s skin tone or color affect the treatment?

The patient’s skin tone should have no effect on the color of the patient’s eye color after treatment.

24. Will the STRŌMA® procedure lighten my skin color?

The STRŌMA® procedure does not affect your skin in any way.

25. Does the STRŌMA® procedure work on all shades of brown eyes?

Our studies so far indicate that the STRŌMA® procedure works on all dark eye-color variations and on all races and ethnicities.

26. How surgically invasive is the STRŌMA® procedure?

The STRŌMA® procedure is not surgically invasive at all. It involves no incisions or injections of any kind. In fact, other than the use of a small device to help keep the patient’s eyelid open during the procedure and the application of some mild topical medications (eye drops), there should be no contact whatsoever with the patient or his or her eye.

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AVAILABILITY OF THE STRŌMA® PROCEDURE

1. When will the STRŌMA® procedure be commercially available?

The STRŌMA® technology is not yet commercially available, and we do not provide anticipated release dates or time periods because there are too many factors beyond our control. STRŌMA® plans to announce initial commercial availability on our website, via email updates to those who have signed up for them, and on social media six months prior to availability in each country. To sign up for updates, click HERE.

2. Where can I have the STRŌMA® procedure performed?

The STRŌMA® technology is not yet commercially available, and we do not provide anticipated release dates or time periods because there are too many factors beyond our control. We plan to announce initial commercial availability on our website, via email updates to those who have signed up for them, and on social media six months prior to availability in each country. To sign up for updates, click HERE.
The procedure should eventually be available in all major cities worldwide. Although we expect to release initially in Europe, we have no way of knowing the order of releases until announcements are made. We also plan to provide a physician database with a search function, so that interested patients can easily locate Certified STRŌMA® Physicians closest to them and confirm whether a physician is a genuine Certified STRŌMA® Physician.

3. When will the STRŌMA® procedure be commercially available in the United States?

We do not expect to obtain FDA approval in the United States until at least a few years after we release the STRŌMA® Laser System in other key markets, like the European Union.

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SAFETY OF THE STRŌMA® PROCEDURE

1. Is the STRŌMA® procedure safe?

STRŌMA® is obsessed with the safety of its technology. We believe that it would be inexcusable to release a cosmetic procedure that poses a significant risk of harm to patients.
The STRŌMA® procedure has undergone several clinical studies in humans, and no adverse events have been reported to date. Before the procedure can be declared safe, however, it will have to undergo additional testing and satisfy the requirements of multiple regulatory bodies. In our next and final study phases, we plan to treat about 200 patients and follow them for about one year. When the results of our clinical studies confirm that our procedure is safe and effective, we will apply for approval on a country-by-country basis and release the technology in a controlled manner to assure positive patient outcomes.

2. Does the STRŌMA® procedure increase sensitivity to light?

People with light eyes are typically more sensitive to light than people with dark eyes, but this is not because of the color of their eyes. People with light eyes have less pigment on the front surface of their irises, but they also have less pigment throughout their eyes, including less pigment protecting the retinas in the backs of their eyes. As a result, these eyes are more sensitive to light than the more heavily pigmented retinas of people with dark eyes. Our procedure does not remove pigment from or otherwise affect the retina, so it would not increase light sensitivity. This conclusion is supported by our clinical studies to date. None of our trial participants has reported any increase in light sensitivity.

3. Will the STRŌMA® procedure affect my vision?

The STRŌMA® procedure should have no effect on patient vision. The STRŌMA® laser treats only the iris. It does not enter the pupil or treat any portion of the inside of the eye, which is where important components of vision are located. We believe, of course, that no cosmetic procedure is worth risking injury to a patient’s vision, and we will continue monitoring visual acuity throughout our clinical studies.

4. How soon after having the STRŌMA® procedure will I be able to drive and return to work?

Recovery should be minimal. The STRŌMA® physician will inform the patient when it is safe to drive and return to work. In most cases, the patient should be able to function immediately after the procedure, although night driving should be avoided for the first few hours because the pupils will be constricted due to one of the eye drop medications.

5. I’ve read that the STRŌMA® procedure could cause elevated eye pressure, which could lead to pigmentary glaucoma. Is this true?

Some physicians on blogs and elsewhere have suggested that the STRŌMA® procedure could cause elevated eye pressure and lead to pigmentary glaucoma. We were concerned about this issue right from the start of our studies, so it was the first issue we tested and measured in our initial pre-clinical and clinical studies. Thus far, pigmentary glaucoma has not proved to be a problem.
The condition, known as “pigmentary dispersion syndrome,” arises from abrasion of the pigment of the iris epithelium, located at the back of the iris. This pigment is much thicker than the pigment on the front of the iris, and the abrasion causes this thicker pigment to be dislodged in relatively large pieces. These pieces travel to the front edge of the iris, where they become trapped in the drainage system of the eye called the trabecular meshwork, thereby reducing fluid outflow and increasing the pressure within the eye (intraocular pressure or “IOP”). It is believed that this increase in IOP can lead to glaucoma, a condition that over time can produce permanent loss of vision.
In the case of the STRŌMA® procedure, the pigment layer covering the front of the iris is far thinner than the pigment layer at the rear of the iris. In addition, the pigment is removed by the natural tissue elimination process initiated by laser exposure, rather than by direct abrasion. Finally, this elimination process digests the pigment into the iris and eliminates it through the blood stream, so it never has a chance to become trapped in the trabecular meshwork. We therefore believe that the risk of any pressure elevation (and therefore glaucoma) is small. Of course, we continue to study this issue throughout our clinical trials.

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ELIGIBILITY FOR THE STRŌMA® PROCEDURE

1. Does the STRŌMA® procedure work on all dark eyes, regardless of how dark and regardless of race or ethnicity?

Our studies so far indicate that the STRŌMA® procedure works on all dark eye-color variations and on all races and ethnicities.

2. Can I have this procedure if I’ve had previous eye surgeries, such as LASIK, SMILE, PRK, IOL implantation, or retinal surgery?

The STRŌMA® physician will determine whether or not you are a candidate for the procedure. Clouding or scarring of the cornea, or previous surgery that altered your iris, could exclude a patient from treatment. In general, however, previous ophthalmic procedures, properly performed, should not preclude a patient from having the STRŌMA® procedure, provided that your eyes are otherwise healthy.

3. Is there a minimum or maximum age for the STRŌMA® procedure?

STRŌMA® will probably prohibit treatment on anyone under 18 years old. The STRŌMA® physicians might impose a higher age limit in areas where people mature more slowly. There is no plan to establish a maximum age limit, so long as the patient’s health does not exclude them from treatment.

4. Can I have this procedure if I have a refractive error, such as myopia, hyperopia, presbyopia, or astigmatism?

The STRŌMA® physician will determine whether or not you are a candidate for the procedure. In general, however, refractive errors, in and of themselves, should not preclude a patient from having the STRŌMA® procedure, provided that your eyes are otherwise healthy.

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COST OF THE STRŌMA® PROCEDURE

1. How much will the procedure cost?

STRŌMA® will not be performing the procedure or setting the price. Instead, STRŌMA® will license and certify leading ophthalmologists in each country, and these ophthalmologists will perform the procedure and set the price for doing so. The price will likely vary from territory-to-territory and from ophthalmologist-to-ophthalmologist, but we expect the price to be in line with other cosmetic and ophthalmic procedures in the same territory.

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CLINICAL TRIALS FOR THE STRŌMA® PROCEDURE

1. Is it possible for me to become a clinical trial candidate for the STRŌMA® procedure?

Click HERE to apply as a clinical trial candidate. If and when we establish a clinical site in your area, we will provide your application to the clinical site physician for consideration. No one will contact you unless and until you have been selected as a potential candidate. You need only apply once. If your location or contact information changes, please submit a new application. Otherwise, there is no need or benefit to submitting multiple applications. All decisions regarding trial candidates are made by the site physicians, and not by STRŌMA®.
During the trial, the second eye is not treated until 1-3 months after the first eye is treated. There are two reasons for this. First, the second eye serves as a “control” to help us interpret data. For example, if a problem appears in both eyes, but only the first eye was treated, that problem is less likely to be a result of our treatment than if it appeared in only the first eye. Second, treating one eye at a time is the more medically conservative approach for the patient. If a complication appears in the first eye, it is best not to treat the second eye unless and until we understand and are able to address the complication.
Once the STRŌMA® procedure is released commercially, both eyes will be treated at the same time.

2. Where is STRŌMA planning to conduct future clinical trials?

We do not provide any information about the location or identity of any clinical trial sites–including the countries in which trials are being or will be conducted–until a particular trial is completed and the site is closed. STRŌMA® does this to protect the safety and confidentiality of the studies, study participants, and study physicians.

3. What happens to those STRŌMA® trial participants with partially treated irises?

The treated portion of the iris is hidden behind the upper eyelid, so it should not show. We always try, however, to invite partial iris trial participants to enroll in a full iris study.

4. Why is it taking so long to complete the STRŌMA® clinical trials?

Clinical trials take time. In addition, we have proceeded slowly and conservatively because we do not want to risk injuring any trial participant. Finally, because it takes up to four weeks for the effects of the STRŌMA® procedure to be complete, we have to treat–wait–treat–wait–and so on. This takes longer than trials where several participants are treated simultaneously.

5. Are any payments made or required for STRŌMA® clinical trial participation?

STRŌMA® does not charge (or accept payment from) any trial candidate. Nominal compensation may be paid to trial participants in some territories to cover lost work or meal, or travel expenses associated with the participation in the study and follow up appointments.

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CONTACTING STRŌMA®

1. Where is STRŌMA® located?

The STRŌMA® offices and research facilities are located in Southern California. For the safety and privacy of our employees, we do not provide our address to the public.

2. How do I contact STRŌMA®?

Please contact STRŌMA® through the applicable link on the CONTACT page. If none of the links applies to your reason for contact, please contact us through our Facebook page.

3. Will STRŌMA® be performing the STRŌMA® procedure?

STRŌMA® is the developer, manufacturer, and distributor of the STRŌMA® Laser System. STRŌMA® will not actually be performing the procedure on any patients. The procedure will be performed by independent physicians, licensed, trained, and certified by STRŌMA®.

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HOW DOES THE STRŌMA® PROCEDURE COMPARE TO OTHER LASER AND COLOR CHANGE PROCEDURES

1. Is the STRŌMA® Laser System similar to any other aesthetic or ophthalmic lasers, such as those used for LASIK, pigmentation, or hair removal?

The STRŌMA® Laser is nothing like a LASIK laser. Their wavelengths, gain media, and fluences are completely different. The STRŌMA® Laser System is more similar to those used for brown pigmentation, hair removal, and certain ophthalmic procedures, but only with respect to wavelength. In all other respects, the STRŌMA® Laser System is completely different. It was designed and built specifically for iris color change. None of these other lasers would be suitable for this procedure insofar as they pose serious risks of injury and would not produce an aesthetically acceptable outcome.

2. What about iris implants, such as those offered by BrightOcular and NewColorIris?

Some physicians change iris color from dark to light by implanting a light colored prosthetic iris on top of your own dark iris. This procedure creates an unnatural appearance because in order to cover the dark iris, the iris implant must be opaque, and light eyes are not naturally opaque. Dark irises are opaque because they are covered in a thin layer of pigment. Light irises, by contrast, are translucent because visible light enter the iris, is scattered by the fibers, and emerges as blue or green light.
More importantly, the procedure is extremely painful and dangerous. In fact, roughly 50% of iris implant patients have the implants removed within 48 hours after the procedure.
Finally, those who are able to tolerate these implants for a longer period of time develop severe ophthalmic complications, including elevated intraocular pressure, glaucoma, permanent corneal clouding and swelling, bleeding inside the eye, and severe inflammation inside the eye. In many cases, these injuries cause permanent vision loss or impairment. Many scientific ophthalmology articles have documented these horrific complications.

3. What about laser iris color change procedures offered by others, such as Neweyes and Eyecos in Spain and Oceaniceyes and Mantis in Turkey?

These procedures use off-the-shelf lasers designed and built for other procedures, typically for burning a hole through the iris to relieve intraocular pressure. They are ill suited for iris color change. Cosmetically, they leave rings and patterns in the iris and often simply remove the red color from brown pigment, creating an eye that changes temporarily to a green hue. This green pigment is opaque, and light eyes are naturally translucent, so the appearance is extremely unnatural. In addition, the pigment typically returns to its original brown color in about six months. As to safety, people who have had this procedure have suffered severe eye injuries, including elevated intraocular pressure, glaucoma, iritis, bleeding on the iris surface, and temporary corneal swelling. As far as we know, none of these procedures has been approved by any government entity.

4. Why not just wear colored contact lenses?

Colored contact lenses are a great way to determine whether you like the way you look with light or different colored eyes. For long-term use, however, there may be some issues to consider. First, in order to cover a dark iris, a blue or green contact lens must be opaque, and light eyes are not naturally opaque. Dark irises are opaque because they are covered in a thin layer of pigment. Light irises, by contrast, are translucent because visible light enter the iris, is scattered by the fibers, and emerges as blue or green light. As a result, blue or green contact lenses will never look natural on a dark iris.
In addition, many people cannot tolerate contact lenses. As many as 50% of people who try contact lenses cannot tolerate them. Contact lenses can also cause infection if not handled or cleaned correctly, and they can scratch the cornea if not put in, removed, or worn properly.
Also, in order to see through a colored contact lens, an opening must be left in front of the pupil. Generally, the size of the opening is the average size of a pupil in typical indoor lighting. But not all pupils are the same size, and lighting conditions change throughout the day and night. When the pupil is smaller than the opening, the brown color shows through, and when the pupil is larger than the opening, the contact lens blocks the light and may interfere with vision, particularly at night.

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PRICE AND AVAILABILITY OF THE STRŌMA® PROCEDURE

1. Will STRŌMA® offer a list of its approved providers?

The STRŌMA® technology is not yet commercially available, and we do not provide anticipated release dates or time periods because there are too many factors beyond our control. We plan to announce initial commercial availability on our website, via email updates to those who have signed up for them, and on social media six months prior to availability in each country. To sign up for updates, click HERE.
The procedure should eventually be available in all major cities worldwide. Although we expect to release initially in Europe, we have no way of knowing the order of releases until announcements are made. We also plan to provide a physician database with a search function, so that interested patients can easily locate Certified STRŌMA® Physicians closest to them and confirm whether a physician is a genuine Certified STRŌMA® Physician.

2. Can we get the STRŌMA® procedure earlier if we pay more?

No, the procedure will be made available to all residents of each territory as and when approved for initial release, and physicians will each set pricing in their respective territories.